Tech For Planet Hub

a global platform for a global issue



Ambition

A dream with no ambition is like an allucination, Check it out !

NUMA has been running open-innovation project for over a decade now, working corporates, startups and local governments towards a common goal.

One key learning? It takes time, but it’s super efficient.

The Datacity program which NUMA have been running for the last three years provide many examples of positive outcome from this collaboration (Intelligent street lighting or understand tourist flows for instance )

Regarding climate-related actions, everyone has their own initiatives -- and unaligned agendas most of the time.

To speed-up city-focused Clim’Act, we announce on the OnePlanet Summit the #TechForPlanet hub initiative.

Its goal? To broaden and accelerate collaborative actions.

What’s new? Startups-focused, the #ThechForPlanet Hub ambitions to help the stakeholders implement innovative solutions on a global scale, providing matchmaking information, collaborative framework, tools and methodologies under Creative commons licence.

On top of seasoned methodologies, it relies on an open-access logic with the following stakeholders: corporate, startup, cities and communities.

Our commitment? To collect, transform and normalize all relevant public dataset and make them available to any stakeholder. For private dataset, TechForPlanet will build partnerships to enlarge its footprint and relevance.


Charter

Because we definitely think that this initiative is primary based on mission driven people

01 - Caring For Climate

#TechForPlanet acknowledges the 2007 ‘UN for businesses’ statement

02 - Global

#TechForPlanet uses internet’s information-collection & sharing potential with no boundaries.

03 - NEUTRAL

the hub is open to any stakeholder on an equal basis

04 - OPEN ACCESS

Hub is open to any stakeholder, be it a contributor or a user.

05 - SHARED

Open-API guarantee open access and reusability to all actionable datas and analysis are published under Creative Commons licensing.

06 - COLLABORATIVE

#TechForPlanet promotes collaboration between all stakeholders.

07 - EASY

Matchmaking is effortless and research features are developed around this key goal. The Hub provides usable framework and tools for Clim’Act.

08 - SPEED

A key goal of the hub it to accelerate effective actions leveraging collaboration and working methodologies.

09 - TRUST

The hub review features establish trust between stakeholders.

10 - CLIM’ACT

The primary impact measurement unit is CO2 emissions.


Q&A

Q1. What is the TechForPlanet Hub?

At NUMA, we’ve run collaborative programs on the global scale of the NUMA network for over a decade now.

Do you know what was the key takeaway?

It takes time, but it’s super efficient.

We realized information and structured data was a pain point for all stakeholders. Knowing who to contact, launching local Startup applications, listing interested Corporations, collecting actionable datasets, repeating ourselves from NYC to Barcelona and Singapore … it works and we’re happy the Datacity program delivers valuable outcomes.

But its takes way too long.

The TechForPlanet Hub we’ve prototyped for today’s Event is a first-response data-matching platform aiming to deal with all these issues. We made a semantic analysis of over 170.000 Startups and 2000 Corporates, and attached them to top-level city-related topics, mapping them over the 200 largest urban areas -- that’s 1,4B inhabitants.

But that’s only the beginning: our goal is to initiate a global TechForPlanet project with open-access data & collaborative resources published under creative commons licensing.

Q2. There are many city-solutions-oriented platform. What’s so special with this one?

Many Corporate vendor have their platform, looking for market reach Yes indeed, many Corporate vendor have their platform, looking for market reach expansion, and trying to seduce Startups into exclusive partnerships. We checked-out quite a few of them.

Some advanced cities have similar initiatives, this time focused on their achievements and projects -- we can name a very convincing platform built by the city of Amsterdam, for one. There are topic-related platform, such as the Bloomberg Philanthropies regarding autonomous car mobility. And many consulting firms have their analytics on which they build strong revenue streams.

The fact is all these valuable initiatives are too scarce, for one, and isolated one from the other, for second. And we could add in many cases that they obey to an agenda which is not always primarily focused on fast and global benefits.

The TechForPlanet Hub differ from these initiative by the fact that it’s natively built for a common benefit. All Cities, all Corporate, all Vendors and Startups will have an equal access to its data and resources. A Charter stating these principle is attached to the project and each partner will abide.

We’re convinced that’s one way to speed-up solutions for the planet -- even regarding NUMA’s delivery of its very successful Datacity program. And we’re willing to give it a shot, inspired by Elon Musk’s Hyperloop guidance - setting an open source logic for a faster global impact, thus the Hub’s Charter.

Q3. What is the Charter you’re referring to?

Why would we need to wrap-up into such a thing an otherwise pretty straightforward project?

We’ve been working collaborative initiatives with Cities, Corporates and Startups for over a decade now do you know what was one very practical learning?

Let us use a funny metaphor: aligning their agendas and motivation does sometime look like driving a herd of cats through a sausage factory. It’s time-consuming, and we know by now that time is of the essence.

But there has been another key takeaway, otherwise we wouldn’t be doing it: it’s super efficient.

The Hub’s Charter states the principles, the final goal, the collaborative and resource-sharing philosophy. When we set these aside in the initial stage, it saves a lot of time for effective work on projects and solutions. The Charter is there to save time and refocus it on problem-solving instead of context negotiation and alignment.

Q4. Why would you adopt and open source logic?

Three years of running the Datacity program gave us a very practical insight on needs and requirements of Startup | Corporate |Cities collaboration.

Cities’ priorities and solutions, methodologies, tools and funding … NUMA has build-up a valuable expertise within its global network, being in Mexico, NYC, Casablanca, Europe and other places.

Two years into the Paris Agreement, and let’s face it: our valuable contribution is a drop in the ocean. With the Hub’s Opens Source planned development, we want to speed things up, but not only.

  • Refocus the project’s core-team’s energy and high level expertise on the most valuable tasks

  • Lower total cost of delivering a solution or en experimentation, by developing the ability to mobilize globally, and mostly online, at least for the preliminary steps

  • Improve the global quality of the deliveries, as it’s a known fact to NUMA that multiple contributions tend to improve quality
  • Larger program advocacy, with support coming from every interested stakeholder

There have been very classic examples in the software industry, and as well in the Event/Media industry (TEDx for instance). Let’s develop an industrial one: Dirk Ahlborn from Hyperloop Transportation shared his vision of mobility at NUMA’s TechForPlanet Event on Dec.11th. But do you remember how Elon Musk had the Hyperloop idea, back in 2013? How he realized he wouldn’t be able to deliver on this idea fast enough? How he decided to share it under an open source logic? Well, today there are over 10 Hyperloop running projects around the world, instead of just one.

With the Hub, we adopt the same logic Elon Musk inspired us: we share resources and tools, we build global actionable databases on an open source basis and we commit to build-up an active TechForPlanet community, focused on accelerating the solutions implementation.

NUMA’s CEO MVLB said it all: “solutions are everywhere, they just need to be implemented faster.”

Q5. Where does the data come from?

For the prototype we’re sharing on the Dec.11th TechForPlanet Event, we used a limited number of public datasets, many from international organizations such as the UN, the World Bank or the EU.

We compiled as well many public-access studies like the Arcadis - Sustainable cities mobility index (2017), or the ‘City Energy Efficiency Scorecard’ from ACEEE (2017).

Regarding waste & water stressed urban areas, we got some very usable insight from ‘Water on an urban planet: Urbanization and the reach of urban water infrastructure’ (2013).

We took into account Lloyd’s famous ‘city risk index’, TomTom’s ‘congestion datasets’, and even TheEconomist/NEC 2017 ranking on city’s safety, mixing-up cyber-safety, mobility and human safety.

Regarding Startups, it was easier on us: we’ve been running Acceleration programs since 2011 and that’s one of NUMA’s asset, with now an international network. We compiled these datas regarding about 10.000 applicant Startups, cross-referenced with public-access sources such as Crunchbase. We applied the semantic methodology we developed for our Corporate clients’ scouting needs, and only kept the ones we could attach to a top-level city topic, and to an urban area.

But let’s be clear about this: it’s only a prototype, and we plan to dig deeper into datasets and cross-referencing going forward into the project. In this digital age, data is everything. That’s the spirit behind the Datacity program we’ve been running over the last three years.

Q6. How exactly did you make the city topic prioritization?

When we decided to share this prototype, we knew this question would come up. It’s clearly one of the most important one. Can we develop a global understanding of the topic taxonomy which still allows for relevant local action?

We were balanced between showing an over-simplifying of very diverse situations that exists in the real world. Were we going after one-size-fits-all analysis and solutions?

How do data global analysis apply to local situations? There are many articles written on funny but spurious correlations. Working data has been NUMA’s specialty, especially within the Datacity program we’ve been running for the last three years.

This is why we decided to give it a shot.

So we took into account urban access to water, or to electricity, kwh per capita and per inhabitants, as measured by the World Bank, city congestion as measured by TomTom, or mobility studies sur as the Qualcom mobility index, for many urban areas, we assessed the number of MTS journeys per inhabitants.

We took as well urban area size, density, or growth rate, all of these stressing urban planning and utilities just as it does on transportation. In fact we took many dataset we thought were relevant to qualify the topics, and I’d be happy to organize for you a meeting with the team who carried out most of the calculations.

The fact is we did build averages and prototypes and yes, we did oversimplify the presentation, and we we nearly stopped the project there.

But finally we carried on. Because we wanted to catch your attention and share a tool & a methodology. Because it only meant we’d need to drill-down on taxonomy analytics, build-up more datasets and analytical capabilities.

NUMA’s CEO Marie-Vorgan Le Barzic states it for the TechForPlanet Event: “solutions are there, the only question is how fast and where to we apply them the fastest”.

That’s exactly what the TechForPlanet Hub is for.

Q7. You’re saying NYC has a lower priority on mobility, which is far-fetched when you have even a superficial knowledge of NYC How did you build your taxonomy and the topics prioritization?

When we decided to share this prototype, we knew this would come up a lot. How do data global analysis apply to local situations? We know there are funny but spurious correlations. Working data has been NUMA’s specialty, especially within the Datacity program we’ve been running for the last three years.

Yes, there are obvious limitations to the over-simplifying first impression this prototypes might leave.

Given the variety of situations that exists in the very diverse real world, we ought to rethink before doling-out one-size-fits-all analysis and solutions.

Now when you think of calculating a safe-city index, what would come up on top of your mind? Is it the cyber safety of its interlaced utility and emergency first response systems? It is the safety of its transportation system? Or the global health of its population? Or its person-crime rate?

Well, it’s all of these, and that’s why we’re stating this as a prototype.

We took into accounts the cities’ income per capita, growth rate, water stress and safety topics in diverse form, and we did build wobbly averages, and yes it might be misleading for NYC, where the NUMA network has an office, so yes, we know about some mobility questions there.

Does it mean we should stop there?

On the contrary, it only means we need to drill-down on taxonomy analytics, build-up more datasets and analytical capabilities, and that’s exactly what the TechForPlanet Hub is for.

Q8. About future developments, can you be more specific?

Three years of running the Datacity program gave us a very practical insight on needs and requirements of Startup - Corporate - Cities collaboration.

Cities’ priorities taxonomy, vendors’ and startups’ solutions, methodologies, tools and funding … NUMA has build-up a valuable expertise within its global network, being in Mexico, NYC, Casablanca, Europe and other places.

Two years into the Paris Agreement, let’s face it. Our valuable contribution is a drop in the ocean.

With the Hub’s planned development, we want to speed things up.

Let us explain.

On the Dec.11th TechForPlanet Event, Dirk Ahlborn from Hyperloop Transportation shared his vision of mobility, a staggering one.

But do you remember how Elon Musk had the Hyperloop idea, back in 2013? How he realized he wouldn’t be able to deliver on this idea fast enough? How he decided to share it under an open source logic? Well, today there are over 10 Hyperloop running projects around the world.

With the Hub, we adopt the same logic Elon Musk inspired us: we share resources and tools, we develop global actionable databases, methods and tools, on an open source basis and we commit to build-up an active TechForPlanet community, focused on accelerating the solutions implementation.

As NUMA’s CEO, Marie-Vorgan Le Barzic stated it: solutions are there, they just need to be implemented faster.

Q9. How do you fund the project?

As you can see, the initial steps are funded by NUMA, and we rely on the data and experience we build-up over the last decade of Startup - City - Corporate open collaboration.

Do you know how many Startup application we received within the NUMA network since we launched one of the first european accelerator, back in 2011?

Well, 10.000, that’s the number. And we’ve seen Smart-city and IoT ramping-up throughout our worldwide network, season after season.

This knowledge, structured and mapped, that’s our initial contribution to shared on the Hub on day one, together with methodologies and tools under Creative commons licensing.

Now we can’t do this on our own, plus it would be counter-productive.

We believe the same Corporates, Smart city and IoT vendors, who contribute to funding initiatives in these areas will be eager to build with us a tool whose side benefit is to expand their market reach.

In fact, since you got all the way here, it could be you, contributing to the project, and giving vision on its features. You’d only need to approve the TechForPlanet Hub’s Charter.

Q10. How can I support the Hub initiative?

Well, the first step would be to sign the TechForPlanet Hub’s Charter. It states the principles, the final goal, the collaborative and resource-sharing philosophy.

Setting these aside we’ll move forward into the projects features and roadmap, focused on data, projects and solutions.

Then we’d go for a pretty straightforward Partnership agreement we can share with you.

What do you think about contacting us to discuss this further? We’d be happy to introduce you to Emmanuel Leger, MD of the global Datacity program within NUMA

Q11. You keep saying it’s super efficient to work collaborative solutions with Corporate, Cities and Startups. Why is it so?

Let us give you an example: Bouygues Energy, providing street lighting to the City of Paris got some shared data from Altice/SFR (tier one french mobile telco) ; the startup Dataiku ran calculation on light optimization. Output? 3% to 10% savings on streetlight energy consumption, immediately actionable. Now there are 200K streetlights in Paris … but 300M worldwide. Did you know each each streetlight was responsible for generating 330 to 1,5 kg of Co2?

Well that’s what Datacity is about, and in the context of the Dec.11th TechForPlanet Event, we think we definitely need the springboard effect the Hub can deliver.

Q12. You keep mentioning Datacity. What is it about?

Yes, the Hub is directly related to Datacity. To some extend, we could think it like a springboard giving more reach to a very promising program NUMA has been running for the last three years.

DataCity is the ultimate response for cities to accelerate innovation through collaboration.

It’s a global open innovation program that brings together Cities, Corporates, and Startups to address together city challenges and develop actionable solutions.

The goal is to build sustainable and efficient cities, using data and technologies.

Our motto: smart collaboration for a smart city!

Let us give you an example: Bouygues Energy, providing street lighting to the City of Paris got some shared data from Altice/SFR (tier one french mobile telco) ; the startup Dataiku ran calculation on light optimization.

Output? 3% to 10% savings on streetlight energy consumption, immediately actionable. Now there are 200K streetlights in Paris … but 300M worldwide. Did you know each each streetlight was responsible for generating 330 to 1,5 kg of Co2?

Well that’s what Datacity is about, and in the context of the Dec.11th TechForPlanet Event, we think we definitely need the springboard effect the Hub can deliver.

Q13. The Hub seems to rely on data. How do you keep them up-to-date?

Very good point. Working on the prototype we’re sharing today, we started to organize data sources and auto-update features. Some very relevant sources already have open-APIs, and the open-data movement is making progresses, especially within governments, both local and global. We want to accelerate this.

We’ve been running the Datacity program for over three years, in various locations, and if there are two key learnings, they would be: it takes time, but it’s super-efficient, and data is everything.

We want the Hub to accelerate the data sharing mouvement we initiated with Datacity.

By sharing methods and tools, matchmaking on a global scale, we want to get this ball rolling.

But we’re not naive: there will be some data management to set in motion, there will be private data partnerships to organize.

Aligning partners towards this goal? Focus energies toward a global cause?

That’s one thing NUMA is good at. Look at today’s event. We had to close registrations after 48h, and there are senior reps from 35 of the top 50 french corporations, and twice as much from international top global corporations. We count on them all for data update and sharing.

Q14. As a partner, what do I get?

First you get to meet with Emmanuel Leger, MD of the DataCity program or one of his teammate.

Let’s organize this.


Time is of the Essence